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Thread: WWI Bits and pieces

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hilton, NY
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    39

    WWI Bits and pieces

    Thought I would post a few pictures of bit and pieces I have made to support builders and restorers of WWI aircraft.

    These wing nuts are known as Fokker Nuts. Fokker used these to fasten cowlings and metal panels to the fuselage. They are not locking, the design is such that in flight they streamline themselves to the airflow, and hang down when on the ground.



    One of my first efforts were compass mounts and corrector magnets for German aircraft. Worked from photo's, sketches, and written discriptions.





    I have plenty more to show if anyone is interested.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Circle Pines MN
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    207
    Yes please!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hilton, NY
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    This is a throttle Quadrant for a Fokker DVII, but Triplane builders are also using them. To make more affordable I created kits for builders to finish.





    Most German and Austrian inline engine aircraft also had an auxiliary throttle on the control stick.



    I made kits for many builders.



    Rotary engines had a control with a single handle.



    More later.

  4. #4

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    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hilton, NY
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    Made some A&P 121 tubing. Wing tips, wing trailing edges and tail surface outlines on most of the Sopwith designs used this. I built a small machine to roll form the tube. Material is the same grade originally used.





    Fokker Used ball and socket joints for Landing Gear struts and wing strut ends on the Triplane, DVII, and DVIII. Sockets are very easy to install in the welded frame, just drill a hole.



    These are sockets that mount in the wing for the N struts on the DVII.



    More this weekend.

  5. #5

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    Jul 2012
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    Circle Pines MN
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    Very interesting, keep them coming.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hilton, NY
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    A good friend of mine had a gas tank made for him by an "expert", it was total junk and not very accurate for a Fokker DVII. He asked me to build a new one, and I told him I was not a sheet metal expert. But he insisted because he was confident I would do a better job than the "expert".

    First I had to learn metal spinning, and make the tools to do it. 6 weeks of frustration and finally got a good one. There are 2 needed for the sumps on the tank bottom.





    The one on the left is from the "experts" tank.



    More soon.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hilton, NY
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    Filler Necks for the DVII tank. These are formed from a flat sheet of brass, rolled and a hem seam formed to close the side. After that the base flange is hammered over. The brass has to be annealed several times as it work hardens during forming. I had very little sheet metal experience, and learned the techniques from the internet.







    The original tanks were pressurized, fittings were made to use modern AN hardware with O-ring seals.



    All riveted and soldered.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Indian Land, SC
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    63
    Very, very nice! Love looking at your work.

    Dave

  9. #9

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    Jul 2012
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    Circle Pines MN
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    Very nice workmanship, and very interesting to see some of the parts for WWI planes.
    Thank you!

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Hilton, NY
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    Thanks for the kind words.

    Continuing on with the fuel tank. The original Fokker built tanks were made from copper. My friend is trying to build his plane as accurately as possible, but for safety reasons I refused to make the tank from copper. There were several makers of the DVII, OAW being one, and they used brass, so that is how I went.





    Also the very early tanks consisted of 3 compartments, main, reserve, and oil tank. Later tanks eliminated the oil tank when it was discovered the hot oil caused vapor lock problems with the fuel system. He is going with a separate oil tank.

    Here are some shots of the hem seam and fixture I made to set the seam on the outside of the tank.







    More soon.

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