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Thread: Replacing The Headset Cable

  1. #1
    falcon21's Avatar
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    Replacing The Headset Cable

    Has anyone replaced the the cable on their headset? I have a Pilot headset and the cable is shot. I assume any stereo replacement cable should work? Any advice on taking the headset apart?

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    Richard Warner's Avatar
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    I have the same problem with two Pilot headsets and also one of my Lightspeeds. The outside covering on the cords are completely shot. I wonder what causes that?
    Last edited by Richard Warner; 01-09-2014 at 10:57 PM. Reason: I had left out a word.

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    I don't know what you mean by "any stereo replacement cable", but I would not assume an off-the-shelf audio cable would be the same. The fact that your headseat is in close proximity to transmitters and antennae, I would think the headset cable would need better shielding. Also, if it's a headset, you'll have a mic circuit and a speaker circuit, or 2 if it's a stereo headset. That's no ordinary "stereo replacement cable". If it's truly shot, just cut it and strip it and see what's in there. Thousands of cables can be found online, though even per-foot orders might be cost-ineffective due to minimum order charges. It wouldn't hurt to ask if Pilot would sell you a replacement cable. There is one advantage to this type of cable, being that there is generally good molding around the plug, helping with strain-relief. You can solder your own plug onto a cable, but might not be able to mimic the same support and flexibility as a molded plug. I would plug in the headset and flex the cable all along its length to try to find the problem. Chances are there is a broken wire within the main jacket. If that break is near the plug, you could cut the plug and solder a new one on, doing your best to add strain-relief. This would be under $10 bucks, I think.

    If you're talking about a typical over-ear headset, I would expect you'd find screws after removing the earpads.
    Last edited by Rotornut; 01-10-2014 at 12:13 AM.

  4. #4
    I'm currently building a headset, and intend to use some left-over audio cable for the microphone side. Curious to see if I'll get any RFI issues. Might not as be as bad in my airplanes, with just a handheld for a transmitter. The antenna is located just behind my right shoulder, though.

    Ron Wanttaja

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    falcon21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rotornut View Post
    I don't know what you mean by "any stereo replacement cable", but I would not assume an off-the-shelf audio cable would be the same. The fact that your headseat is in close proximity to transmitters and antennae, I would think the headset cable would need better shielding. Also, if it's a headset, you'll have a mic circuit and a speaker circuit, or 2 if it's a stereo headset. That's no ordinary "stereo replacement cable". If it's truly shot, just cut it and strip it and see what's in there. Thousands of cables can be found online, though even per-foot orders might be cost-ineffective due to minimum order charges. It wouldn't hurt to ask if Pilot would sell you a replacement cable. There is one advantage to this type of cable, being that there is generally good molding around the plug, helping with strain-relief. You can solder your own plug onto a cable, but might not be able to mimic the same support and flexibility as a molded plug. I would plug in the headset and flex the cable all along its length to try to find the problem. Chances are there is a broken wire within the main jacket. If that break is near the plug, you could cut the plug and solder a new one on, doing your best to add strain-relief. This would be under $10 bucks, I think.

    If you're talking about a typical over-ear headset, I would expect you'd find screws after removing the earpads.
    By stereo I meant a cable designed for a head set with left and right speakers. The shielding on the cables are cracked and you can see wires. Pilot offers a replacement cable and there are a few others. I was wondering if the wiring would be the same across different headsets, I don't see why it wouldn't be. Pilot wants $40 for their cable, Signtronics has one for $28 and of course ebay for only $21. Anyone know of any other companies that sell replacement cables?

  6. #6
    Sirota's Avatar
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    I have had cables replaced on both Lightspeed and David Clark headsets over the years. In both cases the mfg replaced the cable at no charge although the headsets were long out of warranty. Most headset companies pride themselves on outstanding customer service. Call Pilot first and see what they say.

  7. #7
    FlyingRon's Avatar
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    The headphone side is a regular 1/4" phone and if your intercom is stereo, you can use a stereo one, otherwise you need to use a mono one (or short tip and ring together). The microphone side is a bit more problematic as it's a .223 plug left over from the old telephone handset carbon mike days (which aviation mice all emulate). You won't find that at your stereo store or Radio Snack, but specialty places like aircraft spruce will carry them.

    Lightspeed gave me a new cable with a battery box attached to replace the stuck-on battery box I head.

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    Hiperbiper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by falcon21 View Post
    Has anyone replaced the the cable on their headset? I have a Pilot headset and the cable is shot. I assume any stereo replacement cable should work? Any advice on taking the headset apart?
    I replace 'em all the time for folks around here...from the cheaper cables coming apart to the "my wife slamed it in the door" they are all pretty easy to replace. Go slow, take pictures and it the wires aren't the same color on the new cable make a cheat sheet so you don't get confused.
    You can also have ANR inc. upgrade your old PNR to a nice ANR setup (with the new cables) for a few hunderd bucks.
    Here's everything you need:


    http://www.aircraft-spruce.com/menus...pters_ext.html

    Hope this helps

    Chris


    http://www.aircraft-spruce.com/menus...pters_ext.html
    You Tube only proves that more airplanes have crashed due to Video Camaras than any other single reason...

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    falcon21's Avatar
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    I have someone that is replacing the cable for me. Right now I need to find a new cable that goes to the opposite speaker. Where can I find a new wire for it? Is there a "generic" wire that I can use? I know it would have to be heavily shielded.

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    Quote Originally Posted by falcon21 View Post
    I have someone that is replacing the cable for me. Right now I need to find a new cable that goes to the opposite speaker. Where can I find a new wire for it? Is there a "generic" wire that I can use? I know it would have to be heavily shielded.
    Years ago, I used a piece of leftover desktop speaker wire on a cheap Flitecom to do what you're describing. No shielding. No problem. Still working. Your mileage may vary.

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