Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Identify this Plane!

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pearland Texas
    Posts
    36

    Identify this Plane!

    Need some help EAA'ers. This project was started years ago by a man no longer with us. A friend of mine is trying to help identify what it is. My first guess was a Stits Playboy, but I'm no expert. Can anyone identify it by the gear structure, spar attach fittings, etc?

    Project photo 1.JPG Project photo 2.JPG
    Thanks so much for any help!

    Steve

  2. #2
    If you've got shots of the vertical stabilizer, tail feathers, or wings, please post. The gear doesn't look right for a Stits, plus IIRC Stits airplanes had welded steel fuselages. It's obviously a strut-braced wing, though.

    Edit: Durn, that's a weird one. Obviously an externally braced wing (obviously not cantilever) but no structure on the fuselage for a strut nor brace below for wires. I'm thinking biplane, maybe, but there' s no obvious connection point for a set of cabane struts. The gear looks like that of a Baby Great Lakes, but that fixed root area for the wing isn't right.

    Edit 2: Spezio Tuholer fits a lot of the details, but the plane doesn't look like a two-seater....

    Ron Wanttaja
    Last edited by rwanttaja; 11-21-2013 at 08:24 PM.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pearland Texas
    Posts
    36
    Unfortunately these are all I have in the way of pictures. I agree about the fuse structure - as I searched more I see the Stits Playboy fuselage was steel tube. I did however, find this gear structure on some versions of the Playboy. It ends up covered by the fuselage belly skin down to the top of those springs . Looks like some Playboys had this type of gear structure, but most have a spring steel gear.

    @rwanttaja, I have to say, I have been a huge fan, and reader of your writings for a long time. Your writings are what really got me engaged and interested in homebuilts (I think it started with rec.aviation.homebuilt, but I don't remember for sure). I do remember how frustrated I was when you went "off the air" for a while. Anyway, thanks for replying to my post, it made me smile.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pearland Texas
    Posts
    36
    Some of the wire braced planes had the wire attached to the center of the wheel hub, through a hollow tube axle I assume? Maybe that's how it's braced?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pearland Texas
    Posts
    36
    I think it's a Jungster 1 biplane (thanks to a tip on another forum I posted in).

    Gear assembly matches, the length of the wing center section, turtle deck shape, even the fuse structural framing and wing attach brackets match.

    http://www.geocities.ws/jungsterbipe/jungsterspecs.htm



    http://www.geocities.ws/jungsterbipe...ter1sketch.jpg

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Sawdust View Post
    I think it's a Jungster 1 biplane (thanks to a tip on another forum I posted in).

    Gear assembly matches, the length of the wing center section, turtle deck shape, even the fuse structural framing and wing attach brackets match.

    http://www.geocities.ws/jungsterbipe/jungsterspecs.htm



    http://www.geocities.ws/jungsterbipe...ter1sketch.jpg
    Oh, yes, you got it all right. Good catch!

    Nice to hear from a former RAH'er. Didn't Ed Sullivan (the non-dead one) have a Jungster?

    As far as bracing to the center of the wheel hub, sure, some planes do (like the Fly Baby). But it doesn't work if the gear has a shock-absorbing system like bungees.

    Ron Wanttaja

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles KWHP
    Posts
    96
    If it has lower spar stubs that stick out that far from the fuselage, then that kinda steers me towards assuming it is a biplane. Several biplanes had this system, and I believe it is not very common at all to have spar stubs like that on a monoplane. If you look closely, the forward metal spar fittings at the fuselage side looks like it has a tab for flying wires.

    IIRC, the Tiger Moth had stub wings so that the upper and lower main wings could be folded rearward. So a smaller replica Moth might have used the same stub wings to be an accurate replica... But the spar fittings in these photos don't look like they would support a rearward folding hinge.

    The shape and exposed stringers on the turtledeck seem to support a Jungster, according to my decrepitude and hazy memory.

    Glad to see old RAH folks still here too. My scars have almost healed
    Last edited by Victor Bravo; 11-22-2013 at 11:16 AM.
    EZ Flap is the high performance upgrade for Cessna, Piper, Stinson, Maule and Beech manual flaps.
    More performance - more control - more visibility ! 100% Money Back Guarantee www.ezflaphandle.com

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    34
    with that very flat wind screen station maybe a boredom fighter?

  9. #9
    Richard Warner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Covington, LA
    Posts
    68
    The Spezio Tuholer has a steel tube fuselage, Ron.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •