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Thread: Forced landing video

  1. #1
    danielfindling's Avatar
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    Forced landing video

    Just found this and thought I'd share this video of a recent forced landing on Youtube. Possible carburetor ice.

    Here is the NTSB report.

    http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/br...02X10430&key=1

    Here is the video

    http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?feature...&v=JDQVN_G1bM4



    Daniel
    Last edited by Hal Bryan; 02-18-2013 at 10:44 AM. Reason: Embedded Video

  2. #2
    Bob Collins's Avatar
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    What do you think about that long flat highway down there?

  3. #3
    danielfindling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Collins View Post
    What do you think about that long flat highway down there?
    I was thinking the same thing. On the other hand, the snow likely absorbed a lot of energy and the likelihood of hitting a power line, car, or something really hard was probably higher on the road.

  4. #4

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    Soaring pilots are experts at landing out and I know several competitive soaring pilots who have made 100+ land outs. Generally speaking, the soaring community teaches that "you can't get hurt in dirt." A plowed field usually works best. Beyond that, the soaring community has plenty of articles, presentations and even full books dedicated to the subject. There is a lot of good information out there for people looking to learn more.

    Powered pilots usually have less training and experience with off-field landings. During an emergency, they are more likely to be drawn to anything that "looks" like a runway. Although roads look like runways, they are very likely to have signs, posts, wires, traffic and other hazards.

    In this case, the snow was certainly a factor. In a sailplane, flipping is less likely because they tend to slide along nicely on the belly in the event the wheel digs into soft ground. In an airplane or tail dragger, I would have given more consideration to the hardness of the landing surface. However, I'm in no position to say what I would have done in this particular case because I wasn't in the airplane and I didn't have a good look at the landing options. However, fields are usually the safest option so I don't doubt this pilots judgement.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Collins View Post
    What do you think about that long flat highway down there?
    In subsequent interviews both pilot and passengers said that the highway was a considered option but it was dismissed because of traffic and crossing power lines. All felt that the snow covered field represented the least possible harm. I would never judge, I wasn't there to decide based on factors. Bottom line, 4 people and a baby walked away almost totally uninjured physically. The mental harm remains to be seen. I say, very well done Kid!!! Get back up on the horse asap.

    NOW, to add insult to no injury, I just read today that the pilot's aircraft insurance expired at midnight the night before the forced landing and he had not/forgot to renew in time. The insurance company says they will not cover the loss because there are no extentions to premium due dates. Now that really sucks the big one! If my insurance(home, auto, etc) was with that company I'd cancel and let them know why.

  6. #6

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    The pilot probably made the right decision not to try to land on the highway if there was traffic. A light aluminum airplane will come out second best in a collision with a car, not to mention any large trucks.
    I'd try to go in the snow field gear up if possible.
    I had a friend who lost an engine in his T-6 at low altitude over the flat snow covered field north of Denver. He had only moments and no real options, fortuantely had the gear up already and did very little damage, except for the prop, but he says he slide for a half mile.

    The cause was found to be a quirky fault in the fuel shut off and selector valve that cut out fuel to the engine.

  7. #7
    Bob Collins's Avatar
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    Just want to make clear that in asking about the road I'm in no way judging the pilot, nor am I interested in judging the pilot. I'm engaging in the "what would I do in this situation" process that I hope would help me in a similar situation.

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    If he forgot to keep his insurance current, I wonder what else he may have forgotten. Can't fault the insurance company on that one. I understand most av. ins. policies do not have extensions or grace periods.

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    I think he did a very good job. Despite the snow, he chose a good spot and prepared his passengers properly. He'll get another airplane and be a better pilot for his experience.

  10. #10

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    The NTSB report says, "the pilot and his four passengers". That makes 5 people in what I think is a four passenger plane.

    And I am not expert on carb ice because I fly mostly injected engines, but I thought carb ice would be most likely to form under low power conditions, not full throttle as on climb power, as well as it being most likely to form at high humiidlty and around 68* and it was too cold there, below freezing.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 02-18-2013 at 10:26 PM.

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