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Thread: Homebuilts and the FAA

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    I'll just add one thing that nobody else mentioned: Even if you buy a completed, already flying, experimental, and so aren't eligible for the repairman certificate, you can still do all of your own maintenance. Anybody can do any and all maintenance on an experimental. Only the annual condition inspection must be done by the repairman certificate holder or an A&P.
    Where can I find this in the FAR's? I have a FAR-AIM and after a quick look I don't see where experimental rules are covered. Does "maintenance" include things like installing a new propeller, or switching back and forth from land gear to amphib gear?

    PRedmond

  2. #22
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by predmond View Post
    Where can I find this in the FAR's? I have a FAR-AIM and after a quick look I don't see where experimental rules are covered. Does "maintenance" include things like installing a new propeller, or switching back and forth from land gear to amphib gear?
    That's where the fun comes in. There ARE no FARs regulating maintenance of experimental aircraft. The aircraft operating limitations are the only binding guidance. So you can switch the prop or whatever, though you might have to put the plane back in Phase 1 flight limitations.

    Ron Wanttaja

  3. #23
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    That's where the fun comes in. There ARE no FARs regulating maintenance of experimental aircraft. The aircraft operating limitations are the only binding guidance. So you can switch the prop or whatever, though you might have to put the plane back in Phase 1 flight limitations.

    Ron Wanttaja
    FAR 43 covers maintanence and alterations to aircraft. Here is a cut-n-past from 43.1, Applicability. Note in particular paragraph B,1:

    (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (d) of this section, this part prescribes rules governing the maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration of any—
    (1) Aircraft having a U.S. airworthiness certificate;
    (2) Foreign-registered civil aircraft used in common carriage or carriage of mail under the provisions of Part 121 or 135 of this chapter; and
    (3) Airframe, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, and component parts of such aircraft.
    (b) This part does not apply to—
    (1) Any aircraft for which the FAA has issued an experimental certificate, unless the FAA has previously issued a different kind of airworthiness certificate for that aircraft; or
    (2) Any aircraft for which the FAA has issued an experimental certificate under the provisions of 21.191 (i)(3) of this chapter, and the aircraft was previously issued a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category under the provisions of 21.190 of this chapter.
    (c) This part applies to all life-limited parts that are removed from a type certificated product, segregated, or controlled as provided in 43.10.
    (d) This part applies to any aircraft issued a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category except:
    (1) The repair or alteration form specified in 43.5(b) and 43.9(d) is not required to be completed for products not produced under an FAA approval;
    (2) Major repairs and major alterations for products not produced under an FAA approval are not required to be recorded in accordance with appendix B of this part; and
    (3) The listing of major alterations and major repairs specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of appendix A of this part is not applicable to products not produced under an FAA approval.
    Last edited by Sam Buchanan; 02-19-2013 at 07:48 PM.
    Sam Buchanan
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  4. #24

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    Hi All,
    I have a similar question.
    I've come across an airframe I am interested in purchasing that was originally purchased as a kit. I would say at this point it is about 60% complete.
    The current owner took it in trade for some work he had done.
    There is no bill of sale or any build documentation on this airframe.
    I've done some research on different forums as to whether this airframe would be able to be finished up and registered. Some say yes and some say no.
    I figured who would know better than EAA members on this?
    Any opinions and/ or guidance would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Doug

  5. #25

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    I will offer the advice that you should get the serial number of the kit from the prospective seller and call the kit manufacturer. These days folks like Van's keep track of serial numbers sold so that they can manage the sales of parts against the serial numbers. They can likely give you info that allows you to contact the original buyer and see if there are any records at all.

    That said, if the kit is on the FAA list of kits, then you can complete and fly the airplane as an amateur built. But, you might not find your DAR or FSDO willing to issue you a Repairman Certificate so that you can do your own condition inspections. Which is not a big deal as rubbing elbows with your local mechanics is often educational and helps expand your aviation social circle.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS

  6. #26

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    Thanks for chiming in Wes.
    It's an Avid and unfortunately they are out of business.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flypuck View Post
    I've come across an airframe I am interested in purchasing that was originally purchased as a kit. I would say at this point it is about 60% complete.
    The current owner took it in trade for some work he had done.
    There is no bill of sale or any build documentation on this airframe.
    I've done some research on different forums as to whether this airframe would be able to be finished up and registered. Some say yes and some say no.
    I see no reason why this project can not be "finished up and registered." Despite the manufacturer being out of business, some detective work may be required but if I was interested in the project, that wouldn't stop me.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by martymayes View Post
    I see no reason why this project can not be "finished up and registered." Despite the manufacturer being out of business, some detective work may be required but if I was interested in the project, that wouldn't stop me.
    Excellent point. Thanks

  9. #29

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    Jan 2013
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    I would check with your local FSDO or DAR and find out what they're going to need to accept it as amateur built, if there's no builder's log
    for what's been done. Any number of people can work on a project .. but the inspector will most likely want to see documentation.

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