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Thread: Real Cost to build 60'x60' hangar

  1. #1
    flyboycpa's Avatar
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    Real Cost to build 60'x60' hangar

    Hey all,

    I'm enlisting your help to determine the true "finished" costs of the possibility of a hangar at my home airport. I've seen many offers by companies online and in Trade-a-Plane for the basic "box". Other than that, what else am I looking at, and at what rough cost. I'm assuming I'll be looking at a bi-fold door, too.

    Is it realistically doable at $70k, or less?? I'm not looking for an apartment-type or anything fancy. Just basic polished, epoxy-coated floor.

  2. #2
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Well, figure out your required quantity of materials and go from there. For example, a cubic yard of concrete from a commercial source (delivered in a mixer truck) will run you about $100-125. Whether you are willing/able to do the building yourself is going to make a huge difference.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

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  3. #3

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    60 x 60 for $70k.......that works out to ~$19 sq/ft, so I'd put that into fantasy land category.

    Depending on what airport you want to put it on, building codes, etc. a metal building or pole barn style building with a concrete floor is going to be in the $35-40 sq/ft range. And that's on the low side.
    Last edited by martymayes; 11-08-2012 at 10:28 PM.

  4. #4
    steve's Avatar
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    Another data point:
    $125K for a 60x50x14 R&M hangar with a 45 ft wide Hydroswing door and heated floor. That's the complete price including permits, fees, concrete, and labor. The steel and door from R&M cost approx $40K. That was the 2008 cost.
    Other items included in the build cost:
    Basic electric installation - 2 lighting circuits and 8 outlet boxes.
    Natural gas service to the floor heater.
    Water roughed in and sewer connected.
    60x40 asphalt pad in front of the hangar.
    One firewall with 3 layers of 5/8" drywall.
    Glossy concrete floor but not epoxied.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    Another data point:
    $125K for a 60x50x14 R&M hangar

    ~$41 sq/ft. For all the options and extras, that was a good deal.

  6. #6

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    Epoxy floor alone will be several thousand if you have it done. 50 X 60s went for $112K here 8 years ago. That's $37 a square foot. I think you can double your $70K and be close.

  7. #7
    flyboycpa's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your knowledge. This is why I asked all of you. I'm evaluating the options of building my own, or buying into another [already built] hangar. Your numbers give me good information to go on. Thanks again.

    Sam

  8. #8

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    Since none of the previous posters stated that they have actually built a hangar, I will offer my experience.

    First, do not confuse the asking price of a finished building, or the property tax value, with the cost of construction. Not the same. Sellers want a profit for their effort and asking prices generally reflect the current market, i.e., supply and demand.

    About 10 years ago I put up a 48'x48' Erect-A-Tube building in NH. I was the general contractor. Since the building was a residential accessory building, or barn, on the building permit, I did the electrical work, which was signed off by the building inspector.

    Back then the concrete work for the foundation footings and frost wall cost $6K after I dug the trenches with a borrowed backhoe. If I had to pay for all the work including excavation I will guess that I would have spent $10K.

    The complete building delivered to my site by Erect-A-Tube was I think $30K. That is every beam, panel, and bolt for a 48' square hangar with a 48' wide bifold door that opens up to 14'. I can't say enough about the quality of the Erect-A-Tube building kit. Good quality and a great door.

    I think that I paid another $3K or $5K for a crew to assemble the building on site.

    I dug the trench and installed the conduit for underground electric service. That plus the electrical panel and wiring to 115V and 220V outlets and overhead lighting probably cost another $1200.

    The concrete floor was fun. Got a really good crew to pour the floor for a total cost of about $3K. Then I bought high quality Hard Deck white paint and my wife and I put that down. About $2500. A white floor reflects so much light that you only need half of the fixtures that you might install otherwise. We call it the garage-mahal.

    You can add up the numbers to total something just over $50K. Add 20% for inflation and the price is still not that bad. The finished building is worth a lot more than the construction price. So if you have some patience, shop around, read directions, and are not afraid of sweat equity, you can put up a pretty nice building on the installment plan.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS


    P.S. In Tennessee you don't need a heated floor. I don't need one in NH either. Get a large patio heater or two and working in the hangar is just fine in the winter.
    Last edited by WLIU; 11-09-2012 at 01:32 PM.

  9. #9
    flyboycpa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WLIU View Post
    Since none of the previous posters stated that they have actually built a hangar, I will offer my experience.

    First, do not confuse the asking price of a finished building, or the property tax value, with the cost of construction. Not the same. Sellers want a profit for their effort and asking prices generally reflect the current market, i.e., supply and demand.

    About 10 years ago I put up a 48'x48' Erect-A-Tube building in NH. I was the general contractor. Since the building was a residential accessory building, or barn, on the building permit, I did the electrical work, which was signed off by the building inspector.

    Back then the concrete work for the foundation footings and frost wall cost $6K after I dug the trenches with a borrowed backhoe. If I had to pay for all the work including excavation I will guess that I would have spent $10K.

    The complete building delivered to my site by Erect-A-Tube was I think $30K. That is every beam, panel, and bolt for a 48' square hangar with a 48' wide bifold door that opens up to 14'. I can't say enough about the quality of the Erect-A-Tube building kit. Good quality and a great door.

    I think that I paid another $3K or $5K for a crew to assemble the building on site.

    I dug the trench and installed the conduit for underground electric service. That plus the electrical panel and wiring to 115V and 220V outlets and overhead lighting probably cost another $1200.

    The concrete floor was fun. Got a really good crew to pour the floor for a total cost of about $3K. Then I bought high quality Hard Deck white paint and my wife and I put that down. About $2500. A white floor reflects so much light that you only need half of the fixtures that you might install otherwise. We call it the garage-mahal.

    You can add up the numbers to total something just over $50K. Add 20% for inflation and the price is still not that bad. The finished building is worth a lot more than the construction price. So if you have some patience, shop around, read directions, and are not afraid of sweat equity, you can put up a pretty nice building on the installment plan.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS


    P.S. In Tennessee you don't need a heated floor. I don't need one in NH either. Get a large patio heater or two and working in the hangar is just fine in the winter.
    Thanks, Wes. Yes, you're right in that we don't need a heated floor here. The hangar that I'm in currently has a very-light gray epoxy-coated floor that you could nearly eat off of. It also has fiberglass panels in the roof that allow in a LOT of light.

    Sam

  10. #10
    Green Goggles's Avatar
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    I don't know what winters in Tennesse are like, but here in Oklahoma we need heat, and in my opinion, a heated floor is THE way to go.

    For the last 4 years or so, I worked in a 9,000 sq/ft hangar (90x100) with a heated floor, and it was magnificent.
    It is a totally quiet system, there is no moving air being blown around the hangar, and it is a very even heat from top to bottom, left to right. No cold zones.

    Best of all, sitting or lying on the floor is extremely comfortable because it is warm! Tools and equipement don't get cold laying on the ground. Lay your jacket down and it stays warm too.


    Obviously, the heated floor adds cost and complexity to the construction, but if you are considering it, I would go for it.
    After being in that hangar daily, through a few very cold winters, I am total believer.



    Is your hangar for daily work? Or just a storage place to park an aircraft?

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