Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Flying across the border with Light Sport

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    61

    Flying across the border with Light Sport

    I was wondering if anyone has any information on the issue of guys flying under Light Sport across the Canadian border. Lots of guys I know up here in Northern MN have gone SP and most of these guys have places they visit in Canada. Right now our glorious border laws won't allow people to fly across the border without a valid medical certificate. The guys I know are/were PP licensed and previously crossed the border all the time before the new eAPIS system. Once their medical certificate expired they can no longer leagally get back across the border which I think is a bunch of 'horse pucky'!!
    Is there anything being done to alliviate this issue?
    On a side note I know that the amount of border crossings via GA has greatly decreased by the guys I know that used to go to Canada for a weekend of fishing or just plain sight seeing.
    Unfortuantely I am one of these guys. I let my medical expire and am now flying under SP. I had always dreamed of flying up there to visit several friends and now the only way I can do so is by driving. Both my Champ and RANS S-7 have floats and I would love to be able to fly up for a weekend and visit my buddies lake cabins.
    Keith

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    142
    Keith,

    Your post got me thinking, so I went & did a search in the e-APIS & CBP documents to find out where it says a medical is required as it surprised me.

    Found it here - on page 23, but it won't let me copy. It does seem an odd requirement.

    http://www.cbp.gov/linkhandler/cgov/...yers_guide.pdf

    Have you tried contacting the "Private Aircraft Support" section of the CBP directly to ask why a medical is still required? Their email is Private.AIRCRAFT.SUPPORT@dhs.gov

    Good luck!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    918
    I suspect it is because a current PPL is required for international flights. If one doesn't have an active medical, then one doesn't have an active PPL. Within the USA the PPL holder without a current medical is allowed to fly under Sport Pilot rules only - but that's only domestically, since international flights are covered by the ICAO.

    Sport Pilots (and those flying under SPL rules) don't meet ICAO requirements. Only one country (the Bahamas) has a bilateral agreement to recognize the SPL with the USA. It's something I was well aware of when I got my SPL - and didn't care about, since I don't anticipate flying to other nations.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    61
    Frank,

    Yes, you are stating what I already know and that is why I posed the question. Most of the guys I have spoken with, that cross regularly, say they have never been checked for their medical. But these guys are, and have been, regular customers at the crossing sites so I am assuming the agents don't bother checking since they 'know'these people. There are also those guys that have been checked. I am not the type that will 'take a chance' since homeland security laws are nothing to mess with. Those guys are militant!!!
    Up here in the north country there are getting to be more and more 'retired' guys that have gone to LSA and they are the ones that have cabin's or go up there for fishing and vacation.

    We had a fly-in at Moberg's Airbase/Seaplane base this past weekend and the topic of crossing the border came up with quite a few of the guys I spoke to. Many of these guys said that the need for getting to their cabins in Canada was the main reason of owning a plane. Several of these same guys also stated that their visits have been drastically cut back due to this situation and say they no longer see a reason to have their planes and are planning on selling as the rules, regulations, and hassle of crossing have taken all the fun out of it.


    I remember reading an article several months ago about discussions to allow SP licensee's to cross and was hoping someone on here had more inofrmation.

  5. #5
    Rick Rademacher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Urbana Ohio
    Posts
    162
    I have flown into Canada many times in the past. I had to miss this year’s 70 Knotter trip because the group went to Canada. As I now only fly a J-3, I have decided to fly under the sport pilot rules. So, it is now illegal for me to fly in Canada.

    Last year, the Canadian representatives at AIrVenture heard my opinion on this situation. I didn’t see them this year. I would hope that Canada will someday recognize the sport pilot rating.
    Last edited by Rick Rademacher; 08-22-2011 at 11:09 AM.

  6. #6
    steveinindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,449
    Up here in the north country there are getting to be more and more 'retired' guys that have gone to LSA and they are the ones that have cabin's or go up there for fishing and vacation.
    Everything has it's tradeoffs I guess.

    Does anyone know where I can find a list of the countries that don't allow American experimental category aircraft (non-LSA, like normal category but amateur built) to operate without a special authorization?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Rademacher View Post
    I would hope that Canada will someday recognize the sport pilot rating.
    Us Canadians are also hoping that Sport Pilot License will be recognized here as well. Many here would like the ability to use a driver's license as proof of medical fitness. Many of us have friends in the US that are flying under SP and would like for them to come up for a visit.

    As I understand it, the problem is that Transport Canada is maintaining the IACO requirement of each license or permit must have a valid medical to fly in Canadian airspace. Our own ultralight permit requires a medical, even if it is a self declared medical. I have heard that Transport Canada is unlikely to relax their position on this.

    Regards,
    Joe
    Lethbridge, Alberta

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    918
    Hunter, Beaver above holds the key to the "when."

    When Canada adopts the twin of the Sport Pilot license, a bilateral agreement would be quickly agreed on.

    I suspect that on the Canadian side they don't want to admit Sport Pilots (and those flying under Sport Pilot rules) as that would be an admission that it is a viable option for pilots - effectively establishing domestic policy by the means of international diplomacy.

    Plus this would be an issue ripe for petty political advantage, particularly in elections where there is little to differentiate parties or candidates. "So-and-so stands for loosening aviation safety to the danger of the regular citizen who can scarce afford the luxury and expense of owning an aircraft, many of which cost well over a million dollars. Vote for us and we won't abandon the duty of the government to keep you, and our Candian skies, safe."

    I'm being cynical, of course.

    It would be interesting to know how the bilateral agreement with the Bahamas was achieved.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by Beaver550 View Post
    As I understand it, the problem is that Transport Canada is maintaining the IACO requirement of each license or permit must have a valid medical to fly in Canadian airspace. Our own ultralight permit requires a medical, even if it is a self declared medical.
    Looked at that way, a US SP requires a self declared medical (as well as a state issued drivers license).

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    It would be interesting to know how the bilateral agreement with the Bahamas was achieved.
    I suspect that can be summed up in two words: "tourism dollars."

    -Dana

    The lion and the lamb may lie down together, but the lamb won't get much sleep.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    Does anyone know where I can find a list of the countries that don't allow American experimental category aircraft (non-LSA, like normal category but amateur built) to operate without a special authorization?
    It's probably easier to list the countries that do allow US experimentals to operate without special authorization. Other than a few of the US's immediate neighbours, it will be neccesary to apply to the national authority on each occasion. In most cases it will be granted, but usually as day/VFR and private flying only and may require specific insurance to be in place.

    I suspect that the limited number of experimentals venturing further than Canada, Mexico or the Bahamas will mean there's little pressure to obtain standing agreements with other countries.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •