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Thread: Flying to asia vfr requirements?

  1. #1

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    Flying to asia vfr requirements?

    In the last year, there was an article posted about flying to Europe. What are the rules for flying to Asia? Do you need to fly with someone the first time? Who controls the airspace? What limits are there on the route? Thanks.

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    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdainen View Post
    In the last year, there was an article posted about flying to Europe. What are the rules for flying to Asia? Do you need to fly with someone the first time? Who controls the airspace? What limits are there on the route? Thanks.
    The big limit (at least so far as I could tell from talking to the ferry pilots I know) is going to be the weather over the north Pacific (basically along the Aleutians). The control is a mix of American, Russian, Chinese and Japanese controllers depending on where you go. Also keep in mind that a lot of those countries aren't exactly "GA friendly" and trying to get approval for your flight can be onerous or at very least rather expensive. Fuel is also likely to be an issue as not many places carry 100LL as a standard fuel outside of the US (a few places actually have a more or less outright ban on lead containing fuels) and when you do find it, it's likely to be even more expensive than here in the States.

    Just like flying across the Atlantic, it's not something to be taken lightly or to be done on anything approaching a schedule. That is the big take away point in all of this. You might try contacting the FSDO in Anchorage and asking them. They would likely be able to point you to the requirements and practices of a successful crossing if you REALLY want to do this.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  3. #3
    Joe Delene's Avatar
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    There is a lengthy article in the AOPA(maybe online too) magazine about ferrying 2 Cirrus planes to China. They went from CA to Hawaii then island hopped to China, not many islands. Doing a trip like that takes some serious preparation, not to be done on a whim. I imagine there are companies & pilots who specialize in such things.

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    Peter Garrison built an airplane and flew it to Japan. Track him down. If nothing else, his story of building and flying "Melmoth" is inspiring. The Russians are friendlier these days so it should be easier. Japan is not hostile to general aviation, its just that there is less airspace available and the costs are higher. IAC had a magazine article about a Japanese aerobatic contest within the last couple of years. Because of the airspace layout, many Japanese come to the US to fly and skydive. I have met a few.

    If Maverick Yamamoto (yes he is a real Japanese aerobatic pilot) is out there in cyberspace and reads this perhaps he can comment.

    I worked for a guy who flew a Twin Comanche around the world. Island hopped across the Pacific. Lots of logistics to set up, and expensive, but do-able. Hawaii to the west coast of the US was 20hrs in the air.

    Plan on very long legs. These days it may be possible to stop for fuel in Russia, otherwise you might be 20hrs in the air. Be very patient. Aleutians weather is not for the faint of heart.

    Peter Garrison wrote about being enroute to Japan and waking up to discover that both he and his copilot had fallen asleep. The autopilot flew the airplane just fine, but if anything had gone wrong....

    Track down a company that ferrys GA airplanes to the far east and Australia. They can tell you about equipment and the leg lengths.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS

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    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Delene View Post
    There is a lengthy article in the AOPA(maybe online too) magazine about ferrying 2 Cirrus planes to China. They went from CA to Hawaii then island hopped to China, not many islands. Doing a trip like that takes some serious preparation, not to be done on a whim. I imagine there are companies & pilots who specialize in such things.
    Yeah, but who really wants to have a "pleasure" flight with a ferry fuel tank crammed in the back seat?
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  6. #6
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Because of the airspace layout, many Japanese come to the US to fly and skydive. I have met a few.
    Same here. I actually hosted one for a few days when I was living in Michigan. That was one of the reasons I was pointing that a lot of countries aren't "GA friendly".

    These days it may be possible to stop for fuel in Russia, otherwise you might be 20hrs in the air.
    Which pretty much mandates a dual pilot trip, at least in my book.

    Aleutians weather is not for the faint of heart.
    ...or the non-instrument rated. A lot of bush flying experience would probably also help in case you have to put it down in a remote area.

    Peter Garrison wrote about being enroute to Japan and waking up to discover that both he and his copilot had fallen asleep. The autopilot flew the airplane just fine, but if anything had gone wrong....
    LOL That's scary but really funny at the same time.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  7. #7
    Jim Clark's Avatar
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    VFR to Asia? Seriously? First order of business is to get Instrument Rated.
    Jim Clark, Chairman National Biplane Fly In, www.nationalbiplaneflyin.com. Currently flying: 1929 Waco CSO, 1939 Waco EGC-8, 1946 Piper J-3, 1955 Piper PA22/20, 1956 Beech G35, 1984 Beech A36 & 2001 Vans RV9.
    You love a lot of things if you live around them, but there isn't any woman and there isn't any horse, nor any before nor any after, that is as lovely as a great airplane, and men who love them are faithful to them even though they leave them for others.
    - Ernest Hemingway

  8. #8

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    Hi guys,
    These guys did the trip mostly vfr. http://www.azimut270.ch/en/

    So again my questions were more about the rules, not if it is possible or not.

    Thanks

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