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Thread: Flying inflatable boat question

  1. #1

    Flying inflatable boat question

    Hi, all.
    I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this thread, but I'll give it a go anyway.

    My question deals with a flying inflatable boat (specifically a 1999 polaris), and its ability to be legally registered. Somebody with whom I'm acquainted is trying to sell one. This particular craft is a 2-seater, and has NEVER had an N-number.
    Some of the research I've done leads me to believe that since this plane wasn't N-numbered prior to January, 2008, It can NEVER be n-numbered. Therefore, it will NEVER be legal to fly. Can anybody confirm/deny this?

    Best Regards!

  2. #2
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Some of the research I've done leads me to believe that since this plane wasn't N-numbered prior to January, 2008, It can NEVER be n-numbered. Therefore, it will NEVER be legal to fly. Can anybody confirm/deny this?
    I'm not sure about it so I would suggest just calling the FAA registration folks and get the actual "official" stance. There's a lot of supposition and wild assuming that takes place on forums like this one and no sense in getting bad information when the registration folks tend to be rather pleasant to deal with over the phone.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  3. #3

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    The plane can't be registered as E-LSA because the transition period ended. E-AB, probably not unless you can convince a DAR that the plane was 51% amateur built. That leaves experimental-exhibition which is possible, but comes with restrictions on where and when you can fly it.

  4. #4

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    Limited and restricted may also be available. You may also get a flight test if you wish to experiment. Exibition is most likely the way to go and not that restrictive for your likely intended use.

  5. #5

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    I agree with Dana and jedi, convince a DAR that the someone built the aircraft for recreation and/or education or just pursue an exhibition registration. Then post pictures!!

  6. #6
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martymayes View Post
    I agree with Dana and jedi, convince a DAR that the someone built the aircraft for recreation and/or education or just pursue an exhibition registration. Then post pictures!!
    Why wait to post pictures? Let's see this bird!
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  7. #7
    I was considering rebuilding my part 103 legal, cabin high wing, heavy and registering other than U/L. Had the local FAA guys on the phone yesterday, it aint happenin! Anything that was, stays that way. When I asked them "you mean I have to make weight or haul it to the scrapyard?" the answer was "Yep, that's about the size of it".

  8. #8

    Registration and certification are not the same thing

    This thread leads me to believe there is some confusion about the term, “registration.” Registration means obtaining an N number. Getting an N number is easy, but just because you have an N number on a plane does not make it legal to fly. It must be FAA “certified” by means of having an airworthiness certificate issued. An airplane is “certified” (also referred to as certificated) as an E-AB, S-LSA, E-LSA, exhibition, experimental flight testing, etc. An N number (registration) is only one step of the “certification” process. The problem with the plane being discussed is not the N number (registartion); it is the rules of certification. I agree with the other comments that getting this aircraft certified is doubtful, and if it is certified the operating limitations will place tight limits on how it can be flow.

  9. #9
    Thank you earldowns I stand corrected.

  10. #10

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    Angry Heavy Ultralight Certification

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickbrockhaus View Post
    I was considering rebuilding my part 103 legal, cabin high wing, heavy and registering other than U/L. Had the local FAA guys on the phone yesterday, it aint happenin! Anything that was, stays that way. When I asked them "you mean I have to make weight or haul it to the scrapyard?" the answer was "Yep, that's about the size of it".
    The above is probably not true!!! Your local FAA is putting you off wishing that you will go away and not come back. Go back and persue this. You mention cabin high wing but do not specify a make or model. Most likely this was kit built not factory built. If so you may be successful in persuing the AB (Amature Built) classification. If not you can still go the route of exibition, flight test, or restricted. Don't give up without a fight. The Fed's are there as your servent, they just need to be persuaded that you are the master.

    Help! I don't know what a "103 legal...heavy" is. Probably a single seat, overweight, but not 103 legal. Any other exceptions like 6 gallons of fuel?

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