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Thread: Laminar Flow in a Bottle?

  1. #1

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    Laminar Flow in a Bottle?

    You might look at this demonstration of a coating that is something ! I would like to try it on my airplane instead of wax .... who knows what this might/might not do. It really seems to work with ketchup.

    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/...tchup-problem/

  2. #2

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    This is the no stick stuff I think could be the poor mans answer to de-ice for our planes!
    Sid

  3. #3
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    This is the no stick stuff I think could be the poor mans answer to de-ice for our planes!
    Sid
    The idea has been tried before. It doesn't work as well as you might expect and even if it were, the certification process would be such a beast that most aircraft wouldn't be retrofittable to meet FIKI standards for less than what the existing systems are. Nothing that requires certification to be legal is the "poor man's answer" to anything.

    That said, it might be potentially useful if used in concert with something like Thermawing or deicing boots.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  4. #4

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    Great idea. The GE guys are already working on an anti-icing idea like this. Now if those darn glass bottles were more recyclable. Wonder if this works on plastics, too?

  5. #5
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    The GE guys are already working on an anti-icing idea like this.
    I remember hearing something about this from a couple of them up at Oshkosh but I thought it wasn't intended to be a stand alone system but rather as a way to improve existing systems. From the way they made it sound, it was predominately for runback protection aft of deicing boots or heated leading edges. Can you elaborate as to what you know about plans for the use of this technology?
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  6. #6

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    I wonder if the stuff would work better than Icex? I think I want it to be tested more before I consume ketchup out of one of those bottles before a long flight.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred View Post
    You might look at this demonstration of a coating that is something ! I would like to try it on my airplane instead of wax .... who knows what this might/might not do. It really seems to work with ketchup.

    www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/05/23/mit-researchers-fix-ketchup-problem/
    Try http://www.airglideltd.com/aviation/ , they use nanotechnology to reduce drag, I intend to use it on my VTOL aircraft that cruises at 475mph.
    Good luck, Stan

  8. #8

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    Forget ice, how about bugs! I spend way to much time cleaning bugs off my airplane. Maybe this would make that job a lot easier.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    I remember hearing something about this from a couple of them up at Oshkosh but I thought it wasn't intended to be a stand alone system but rather as a way to improve existing systems.
    All of the current products are to delay icing (not anti- or de-icing). I believe that GE is talking about it in their engines/fan blades ... which already handle icing conditions well. Can't say more, but look for good things to come.

    This particular coating is really expensive. Also keep in mind what an advertiser claims and what they want you to believe. For example, there are many companies that have CERTIFIED anti-/de-icing systems that are not certified for flight into known icing (FIKI). In other words, and in this case, to be certified, the manufacturer just has to prove that it doesn't adversely affect anything else on the airplane. A spray-on coating won't hurt anything else as far as the type certified airplane.

    With all that said, there are definitely going to be some breakthrough technologies coming in anti-icing technologies in the near future (it has been identified as a "hot" topic). The biggest hold-ups (IMHO) are going to be 1) Does it work in all icing conditions? 2) How does it weather? 3) How does the surface abrade, and does it ice in the abraded area? 3) How do you know when to replace the coating?

    We went through all these hurdles when certifying PPG Surface Seal (high quality Rain X) on glass windshields. Note: glass doesn't shed water drops as well as Plexiglass.

  10. #10
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Forget ice, how about bugs! I spend way to much time cleaning bugs off my airplane. Maybe this would make that job a lot easier.
    Amen to that.

    All of the current products are to delay icing (not anti- or de-icing). I believe that GE is talking about it in their engines/fan blades ... which already handle icing conditions well. Can't say more, but look for good things to come.
    That's cool. I'll definitely be interested in seeing what comes out of it.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



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