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Thread: Help - we need your ideas!

  1. #1
    EAA Staff / Moderator Hal Bryan's Avatar
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    Help - we need your ideas!

    In thinking about the young people that come to Oshkosh, we're looking for suggestions: What can we do to improve the AirVenture experience for teens, say ages 13-18?

    Hal Bryan
    EAA #638979
    Online Community Manager
    EAA—The Spirit of Aviation

  2. #2

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    Get them some cockpit time in some great planes, and get each of them a short flight in something. Obviously everyone can't get a B-17 or Stearman flight, but get them up in something. Really flying, not just talking about it or seeing the video. If there is a shortage of flights avialble , then I'd give priority to the older kids who are at the age to start taking lessons as it may mean more to them.

    Maybe one day of the convention week Pioneer airport can be a real airport and do kids rides out of there , perhaps in some of the many Cubs. Or if you have to , get a bus and do some out of FLD. Or do them at 7 am or so on. Find a way.

    And Hal, for those other people who don't really want to do this, they can find many, many excuses: it's too crowded, too many other things going on, it would interfere with the big money flights like the Socata and other advertisers, etc, on and on. Doesn't take much to say no.

    Sitting on the ground and talking about flying is ok, but sort of like standing outside Krispy Kreme and watching someone else eat donuts.

    Takes someone special or many someones to make it happen.

    I only have my Bonanza this year, but I'd do some rides. I have done some Young Eagle rides at OSH.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 04-30-2012 at 01:35 PM.

  3. #3
    Anymouse's Avatar
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    That's right in the glider solo range. Perhaps a way can be found to do some glider rides, and let the teens actually fly it. Sorta like discovery flights for gliders.
    I'll come up with something profound

  4. #4
    CarlOrton's Avatar
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    I agree with Bill. NOTHING compares to butts in seats. Look at how many stories we read in SA or AOPA or any flying mag about successful pilots who got their first flight as a YE.

    I don't mean to sacrifice the cash cow here, but perhaps 1-2 days of the convention you could take a few hours and ground the helo's and fly the same circuit, but in a cub(s). That way, it would be out of the arrival traffic, wouldn't interfere w/airport ops, and would give a GREAT overall view of the event. Truly memorable. Or maybe extend it just a bit to give them some actual stick time. Might be too short a stint, but might be enough to get them started.

    Perhaps have as a requirement to ride that they participate in a one hour "ground school" to get them ready. Teach them what they're going to see and do, and basic aircraft control. Could even have them build a small model with truly movable control surfaces so they could use it in other related studies.

    Then, give them a free Sporty's Ground School password if they're, oh, say, 15+.

    Prepare, Introductory flight, and Continue - hey, that's PIC!

    Alternatively, perhaps set up an area where you can set up some of those (sorry, can't articulate what they really are) flight sim "seats". You know, the ones with the controls in a realistic setting, with 2-3 panel displays. Make it a dual-seat version with headsets and all, and let them book a 1-hour "flight" lesson with a real instructor. Perhaps isolate it just a bit so that you don't have little brother pestering his sister to do a roll or other distractions. Set it up so that it's pretty realistic. Could simulate a non-towered field, but would still allow the pilot to state their intentions on the "CTAF", etc. Tower scenarios might intimidate them too much.

    Treat it just like a real flight, minus the preflight of course. Be able to set freq's, have some positive feedback controls to simulate air loads, etc.
    Last edited by CarlOrton; 04-30-2012 at 02:10 PM.

    Carl Orton
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  5. #5

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    I'll get my 17 yr old daughter & her boyfriend to chime in here later (they're still at school now). I'll just let them tell you what they would like.

  6. #6
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    What can we do to improve the AirVenture experience for teens, say ages 13-18?
    I asked a couple of the kids in my neighborhood and basically they echoed Bill Greenwood's first point:

    Get them some cockpit time in some great planes, and get each of them a short flight in something. Obviously everyone can't get a B-17 or Stearman flight, but get them up in something. Really flying, not just talking about it or seeing the video. If there is a shortage of flights avialble , then I'd give priority to the older kids who are at the age to start taking lessons as it may mean more to them.
    The other suggestion from a slightly younger group (10-12) that we had previously asked something similar (how to get them more involved at a local airshow) was to have a "meet and greet" for the kids with a famous pilot (Sully was a common suggestion given that we were asking a few months after the Hudson incident). Just the pilot and the kids that way the kids get the chance to really ask questions, etc.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  7. #7

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    Ask for volunteer pilots to use their aircraft and have the worlds biggest Young Eagles Event !!!. There will be plenty of aircraft and I would bet you will get more volunteers than you can use. If I make it this year I would be happy to join in.

  8. #8
    Rick Rademacher's Avatar
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    Could we have one or two Cubs in the grass where Rutans aircraft were parked on the edge of ConocoPhillips Plaza? Cubs could be rotated in and out for those that want to participate.

    Kids in Cub for pictures and to explain
    1.Fabric – be careful - metal or composite – name of aircraft – Cub
    2.Kids climb in – keep door open – show how light – history of Cub
    3.Prop - no key – don’t move
    4.Flight controls - let them move joystick - take pictures
    5.Do you understand controls? Shut door – go for a short flight – kids’ faces. Parents love this!
    6.Door open in summer – closed in winter
    7.Quiz kids and/or parents on fuel gage/indicator
    8.Kids climb out – show rubber bands – bungee cords
    9.Ask kids for name of aircraft they sat in
    10.Hand out – Piper Cub water tattoo
    11.Next –
    When not flying Young Eagles, this is how I use my Cub. Over the last 17 years, I have had thousands in and out with no damage to the Cub

    This suggestion was made last fall for the Cub 75th anniversary. Will this happen? No word yet from the EAA.

    Rick at www.cubs2oshkosh.com
    Last edited by Rick Rademacher; 05-02-2012 at 08:04 AM.

  9. #9
    Jim Clark's Avatar
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    I agree with Rick. In the congested OSH environment it would be tough to conduct flights but really easy to put kids in seats for photos. When I take my Waco's to events I do this and you wouldn't believe how many pics of kids in the pilot seat holding the yoke or stick with a headset on are posted to Facebook in an afternoon.
    Jim Clark, Chairman National Biplane Fly In, www.nationalbiplaneflyin.com. Currently flying: 1929 Waco CSO, 1939 Waco EGC-8, 1946 Piper J-3, 1955 Piper PA22/20, 1956 Beech G35, 1984 Beech A36 & 2001 Vans RV9.
    You love a lot of things if you live around them, but there isn't any woman and there isn't any horse, nor any before nor any after, that is as lovely as a great airplane, and men who love them are faithful to them even though they leave them for others.
    - Ernest Hemingway

  10. #10

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    Maybe some time with a Radio Control Model with an experienced RC instructor using a trainer box.
    Some of the new foam model are almost harmless in the event of crash. But with an instructor, the risk is minimal anyway.

    RC models are a good affordable entry level for learning all about aviation.

    Some professional RC demos might be good, as well.

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