Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: speed brake for taylorcraft.

  1. #11

    Taylorcraft

    The Taylorcraft was originally from the states but when it was imported here in Canada it meets the ultra-light category because of the weight. We can do our own maintanance and enter it in a log book. There are quite a few taylorcraft,s here in Canada under this category.Rick

  2. #12
    steveinindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,449
    Quote Originally Posted by richard cartier View Post
    The Taylorcraft was originally from the states but when it was imported here in Canada it meets the ultra-light category because of the weight. We can do our own maintanance and enter it in a log book. There are quite a few taylorcraft,s here in Canada under this category.Rick
    Ah...that's right. You guys have an ultralight category that is akin to the American LSA category. I totally blanked on that. *facepalm*
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  3. #13
    bigdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Spring, TX
    Posts
    57
    The Taylorcraft TG-6 glider and L-2M tandem had spoilers. There were about 5 inches wide and spanned the 3 rib bays inboard of the ailerons. The hinge was at the front spar and they popped up via bellcranks mounted on the spar with a common rod driving all 3. The wing was virtually identical to the side-by-side models but with wooden ribs so the aerodynamic effect should be the same. I've got a L-2 project that was converted from a TG-6 so I know where and how they were mounted but I've never flown with them. You could seek out some L-2M owners that have spoilers (not all do) and see what their experience is. I had a BC12D 30+ years ago and remember getting in and out of 800 ft patches at sea level. That was with a 65hp but it's way too long ago to provide any guidance.
    Regards,
    Greg Young
    1950 Navion N5221K
    RV-6 N6GY - first flight 5/16/2021
    1940 Rearwin Cloudster in work
    4 L-2 projects on deck

  4. #14
    Cary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    255
    I have a whole hour of dual in a T-craft, so I'm a long way from being an expert. But as a long dormant CFII, I suggest that your floating is likely from too quick an approach speed. A Google search shows that the T-craft's stall speed is 35-40 mph, which means to me that your final approach speed should be around 45-55 mph--and I would choose the lower end of that range. Or you can use the mountain flyer's method, which is to get up to a safe altitude, find the indicated stall speed, and multiply that by 1.3, and then use that as your indicated approach speed. It won't be perfectly accurate, but it'll be close enough and safe to use. And I'll bet your floating will be a thing of the past.

    Cary
    "I have slipped the surly bonds of earth...,
    put out my hand and touched the face of God." J.G. Magee

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hood River, OR
    Posts
    26

    Taylorcraft Speed Brake

    Just a thought. Could you be referring to the spoiler that some of the Taylorcraft L-2s had? I certainly don't recommend trying to install one in an airplane not designed for it. The other comments are to the point. Much better to get some instruction and practice.

  6. #16
    steveinindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,449
    Could you be referring to the spoiler that some of the Taylorcraft L-2s had?
    If I remember correctly- as there were beers involved- a WWII L-2 grasshopper pilot that I met mentioned nothing about using a spoiler during shortfield landings and I had a long talk with him about extreme short field operations for medical evacuation and resupply specifically asking about the techniques involved. His comment about how to best do it was to fly it "a couple knots" above stall and land uphill. This came with the caveat that it should only be done when staying in the air is more dangerous than getting on the ground (in other words, when people are trying to shoot you down, i.e., he would not do it as a civilian).

    One of the best stories he had to tell was about hauling whole blood in glass bottles to the forward hospital units. Apparently some German took a pot shot at his plane. He heard the bullets hit the plane and the next thing he knows he's covered in blood. Upon landing the medics stripped him down to find no injuries only to realize that all the blood had come from a shattered bottle.

    Also, i've seen quite a few vintage L-2s from that time frame and I can't recall any of them still having a spoiler still installed. It could be a selection bias though or something similar....
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    46
    I am one of those 500+ hour Taylorcraft pilots. I agree with the advice given above about getting some dual from an experienced Taylorcraft instructor. An 800 foot runway for a Taylorcraft is very doable if there are not extenuating factors, such as soft mushy ground, tall grass, obstacles, high density altitude, or a steep gradient.

    I regularly land at my home airport on a paved runway with no obstructions in less than 200 feet. That is with no one else in the plane but me and less than half fuel. Depending on the density altitude, I can take off in about 300 feet under the same circumstances. That is with the original A65 engine and 6.00 X 6 tires.

    The technique I use for short field landings is to slow down well before entering the flare. As you may know, when in ground effect induced drag is reduced. If the drag is reduced, you are going to decelerate slower. Meaning more runway will go by before you slow down to landing speed. So you need to arrive at the runway already slowed to the speed you will actually touch down at. For my BC12D with itís 65hp engine, I reduce to about 1300 rpm on downwind and allow the airspeed to slow to about 65 mph indicated. At 65 indicated and 1300 rpm, I will descend at about 400 feet per minute. On base I ease the nose up to slow to 60 mph indicated and adjust rpm to maintain the descent. Turning final I raise the nose a little more to about 55. At this point with my left hand on the yoke and right hand on the throttle, I am adjusting airspeed with my left hand and altitude with my right. I like to slow to about 50 on short final. I like to maintain 50 indicated until I am just over any obstacles, or the runway is about to disappear under the top of the cowl. Then I reduce power by about a ľ of an inch of throttle. I donít look at the tach or airspeed at this point. I am flying by feel. If I am sinking to fast, I add a touch of throttle back in. Too high, reduce throttle just a hair. I can judge the airspeed by the feel on the yoke. My last trim setting was on base at 60 mph. When you are over the runway with the correct sink rate, just pull the throttle ALL THE WAY OFF just before you touch down and apply a slight increase in back pressure on the yoke. For short field you are not trying for a grease job touch down. It is more important to get it down. If you are dropping in from too high, just delay the power reduction.

    Once you practice enough you will know the feel it takes for each airspeed below that. And that is the secret to making really short landings in almost any airplane, PRACTICE. Find a runway with a comfortable length and practice short field landings on it before you try it on an actual short field. Also practice doing a go around and donít hesitate to use one if things get uncomfortable.

  8. #18
    Larry Lyons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Stockton, IL.
    Posts
    49
    Might I suggest you go to the Taylorcraft link below and do a search there on slipping and or slow flight. A very nice bunch of people there will jump in to help you with suggestions on technique.

    http://vb.taylorcraft.org/forum.php
    Last edited by Larry Lyons; 04-27-2012 at 12:20 PM.
    No matter how far you push the envelope; its still stationary!

  9. #19
    highflyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    southern Illinois
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by richard cartier View Post
    I have a Taylorcraft with an 80 hp. The problem is the aircraft floats like hell and with 800 ft of runway I am looking to install an airbrake of this aircraft. Don,t need an stc as this is classified under the ultra light category. Any help would be appreciated as for info and details on how to do it. Rick Cartier
    Did you get that information about an stc from the FAA? No 80 horse Taylorcraft is classified under the ultralight category. It is a certified aircraft no matter how it is used. It is legal to fly it with a "light sport" license or a regular license with a driver's license medical. However, the aircraft itself is still a certified aircraft. It must be annualed by an IA and modifications require an STC or a field mod.

    That being said, if it is an L2 Taylorcraft it originally had spoilers, which are very effective at canceling float.

    Having flow Taylorcraft's of all models many many hours over many many years, I can say without reserve, that the Taylorcraft does NOT float UNLESS you are flying too fast on your final approach. The Taylorcraft is a surprisingly clean airplane and loses speed very slowly once you are into ground effect. You have to get rid of your excess airspeed before you round out and attempt to flare. As I recall, depending on how much you and your passenger weigh, you want to come over the fence with most B series Taylorcraft at no more than 55 mph. At 60 mph on a hot summer day with a 5000 foot asphalt runway you can float right off the far end. :-) The L2 or D model Taylorcraft are heavier and will want to come over the fence at about 60 instead of 55. Once again, excess airspeed will take a LONG time to bleed off if you are a bit too fast.

    Rather than destroy you airplane with illegal modifications, you would be better advised to find a good old timer taildragger CFI and get some dual on landing the T-Cart.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    FA40
    Posts
    761
    Quote Originally Posted by richard cartier View Post
    i am looking to install an airbrake of this aircraft.
    SPEED BRAKE ON A TAYLORCRAFT?

    thanks for the chuckle, Richard.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •