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Thread: Third Class Medical Exemption Request - Joint filing by EAA and AOPA

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    EAA Staff / Moderator Hal Bryan's Avatar
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    Third Class Medical Exemption Request - Joint filing by EAA and AOPA


    Hal Bryan
    EAA #638979
    Online Community Manager
    EAA—The Spirit of Aviation

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    When should we submit comments supporting the exemption request? I'm eager to voice my support to the FAA on this.
    -Joel Marketello

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    Third-class Exemption

    Let,s rationally support this action through our organizations and political representatives and not become lost in "greed-grabs" for more hp, passengers, configurations and passenger capacity along the way. This change may be as significant or more so than the LSA/Sport Pilot program and be a future basis for even more of the changes many of us might desire. Now is the time to get it done ! I solicit the active, positive support of EAA pilots to our mutual benefit.EDGEFLY

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    Thanks Hal,

    I got this yesterday via AOPA's E-Brief. Now everybody just be patient this isn't going to happen overnight, but we'ret holding a strong hand!

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    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDGEFLY View Post
    Let,s rationally support this action through our organizations and political representatives and not become lost in "greed-grabs" for more hp, passengers, configurations and passenger capacity along the way. This change may be as significant or more so than the LSA/Sport Pilot program and be a future basis for even more of the changes many of us might desire. Now is the time to get it done ! I solicit the active, positive support of EAA pilots to our mutual benefit.EDGEFLY
    This.....although I will say that the current proposal doesn't mean much to me in a practical sense since I do very little slow day VFR operations. However, steps in the right direction are just that....
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



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    Quote Originally Posted by EDGEFLY View Post
    Let,s rationally support this action through our organizations and political representatives and not become lost in "greed-grabs" for more hp, passengers, configurations and passenger capacity along the way. This change may be as significant or more so than the LSA/Sport Pilot program and be a future basis for even more of the changes many of us might desire. Now is the time to get it done ! I solicit the active, positive support of EAA pilots to our mutual benefit.EDGEFLY
    I can understand the 'greed grab' comment, however, I wonder why we must submit to these tactics to get what is reasonable. In talking with 'medical brokers' I have an 85% chance of passing my 3rd class. If I fail I'm out. Not good enough, It forces me to light sport. Now comes the elimination of the 3rd class for restricted flying. None of it makes sense as my drivers license allows me to carry several passengers in a vehicle that weighs in excess of 50,000 lbs of many hundreds of horsepower in traffic situations far more dangerous than flying a light plane, on controlled federal highways at night. Where is the sense in the restrictions on flying that we must endure. The FAA is, as many government agencies are, repressive and our fighting for realistic liberties to excersize our right should be carried forward with any tools we have at our disposal, letter writing, voting, going to meetings, etc, as well as working through our organizations. This is a step in the right direction but the FAA has a long way to go in lifting past restrictions that make little sense other than controlling everything they can.

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    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Not to play devil's advocate, but take a look at the rate of motor vehicle crashes due to medical reasons and compare it to the rate for aviation. You'll notice a pretty hefty difference once you get up in to the sixth, seventh and eighth decades of life.

    That said, I agree that for the most part the medical standards for pilots are excessive.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



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    Obviously a step forward but the real problem lies with the age / frequency requirements. For a Class C medical, requirements should be every 5 years until age 60 and then every 2-3 years. To have 40 year olds get a medical every 2 years is excessive in frequency and expense. There should be more frequent requirements for certain known conditions but a healthy person with no previous known issues should be able to go 5 years between required Class C check ups if under 60.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    Not to play devil's advocate, but take a look at the rate of motor vehicle crashes due to medical reasons and compare it to the rate for aviation. You'll notice a pretty hefty difference once you get up in to the sixth, seventh and eighth decades of life.

    That said, I agree that for the most part the medical standards for pilots are excessive.
    The comparison to driving cars is a point in reasonable balance. Under the potential new rule we fly using a drivers license and medical awareness training in lieu of a medical certificate. When driving a car there is no requirement for medical awareness, but perhaps there should be after a certain age. There are no restrictions when driving a car regarding speed capability, horsepower, number of passengers, etc; why should there be with airplanes. What difference does it make if the pilot is incapacitated in a plane that flies at 100 vs 200 mph? The outcome is the same. What does horsepower or weight have to do with it? Anyone could make arguments for all kinds of restrictions on planes, cars, boats, etc, to the point that it's not worth having any of them. Restrictions on operating all modes of transportion should be uniform and reasonable.

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    This rocks on so many levels!

    First, it keeps PPL's - for the most part - in the aircraft they already own and are familiar with. A lot of misfortune has been dealt by guys going from larger planes to (sometimes) twitchy LSA's, which require a suprising amount of transition training.

    Second, it will keep the price of LSA eligible aircraft down, at least hopefully. In a few years I'll be in the market for a Champ, and I'd like not to compete with a glut of Private Pilots looking for a light fix to their addiction.

    Third, it fits with the type of flying the Average Joe out there is doing - daytime VFR either solo or with one passenger - so it's not unduly burdensome. Now they can fly to their destination and carry baggage, too!

    [edit]

    The FAAST team needs to get hot on the medical education seminars! It's a great way for them to put two birds in the same egg basket - encourage WINGS participation while educating more than just PPL's looking to transition to Recreational Pilot rules.
    Last edited by Frank Giger; 03-23-2012 at 06:18 PM.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

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