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Thread: what do guys cut 4130 tubing with?

  1. #1

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    what do guys cut 4130 tubing with?

    I know a hacksaw will work but I don't how straight I can get it cutting free hand. Do power chop saws/cut-off wheels work or does the heat buildup alter the metal?

  2. #2

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    I use a tubing notcher.

  3. #3
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Downey View Post
    I use a tubing notcher.
    That would be my suggestion but then again, I don't use 4130 (because for most applications there are better alternatives) so I don't have first hand experience with that particular alloy.
    Last edited by steveinindy; 03-03-2012 at 10:39 PM.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  4. #4
    I use a table saw with a sheet metal blade. Then shape the end with tin snips and a bench grinder.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtrom View Post
    I know a hacksaw will work but I don't how straight I can get it cutting free hand. Do power chop saws/cut-off wheels work or does the heat buildup alter the metal?
    If you are going to notch the end of the tubing for fitting and welding to other tubing, straightness of the cut has little relevance. If you want an inexpensive way to fit tubing, one of those cheap oscillating spindle drum sanders can do almost anything you need. It's fast, the tubing end needs no additional clean up like after using a saw, notcher or other methods, they have spindles sizes down to 1/2" so you can select one that fits the tubing size perfectly and oh yea, they are cheap. Can find them new for $100. In the past I've built a whole fuselage with a hacksaw and a file but not much into "manual" stuff anymore.

  6. #6
    I use any of the following: A hacksaw; an angle grinder with a cutoff blade; a metal bandsaw. Of the bunch, I have found the angle grinder seems to work the best. One of the Homebuilders Tips videos with Earl Luce has him demonstrating the use of the angle grinder.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jtrom View Post
    I know a hacksaw will work but I don't how straight I can get it cutting free hand. Do power chop saws/cut-off wheels work or does the heat buildup alter the metal?
    A table saw with a cut-off wheel cuts 4130 very readily. It does create a lot of sparks, however, so use a face shield. The welding process will normalize the metal so heat from cutting is no concern.
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  8. #8
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    It does create a lot of sparks, however, so use a face shield.
    And a collared shirt buttoned up all the way. LOL Few things are worse in metal working than having hot sparks go down your shirt collar. Speaking from first hand experience.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  9. #9
    It depends on the thickness of the 4130. I usually use a smooth bandsaw blade and friction cut the stuff. You have to use full speed and keep the blade guides in good shape, but it really works! It also works on titanium, but be careful that you don't catch the chips on fire.

    On big stuff I use a cutoff wheel, which makes a lot of dust and sparks.

  10. #10
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    It also works on titanium, but be careful that you don't catch the chips on fire.
    That's going to be the fun part when it comes to building my larger design because about half the cabin's framework as well as the main spars in the tail and wings are designed to be built from titanium as a weight saving measure.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



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