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View Full Version : Mr. Piper rolling over in his grave!



Rick Rademacher
09-08-2011, 07:22 AM
As Mr. Piper was a marketing man, I am not sure he would have approved of this information about the cubs. At least, it was on the front page of the local paper before the event. Now the public knows that a Piper Cub is an airplane. Itís a start.

I did not approve of this copy!

Hal Bryan
09-08-2011, 07:31 AM
J-3 Cubs ... originally manufactured in Canada, eh? Wow. There were some J-3s and L-4s manufactured (or at least assembled?) under license up north, as I understand it... but, somehow, I don't think the writer of this piece deserves the benefit of the doubt.

And it'll be great to see the "high speed" (okay, compared to a Cub ...) Yak-52s and "the" Bell helicopter... All this time, I thought they made more than just the one.

On the other hand, it is a positive story about a GA event, and that's all-but priceless.

Chad Jensen
09-08-2011, 07:33 AM
Wow...that's a huge error! I'm sure letters have been sent to correct that...

Weren't the Yak-52's built in Lock Haven?? <JOKING, Cough, cough> ;)

Hank
09-08-2011, 08:02 AM
Good article, and should be a great event.

The general public is so uneducated about aircraft that some people think we ALL fly Cubs . . . . .

Chad Jensen
09-08-2011, 08:03 AM
It was a positive article...very thankful for that!

Frank Giger
09-10-2011, 12:40 AM
Good article, and should be a great event.

The general public is so uneducated about aircraft that some people think we ALL fly Cubs . . . . .

Sheesh. Some of us fly Champs!

David Darnell
09-10-2011, 09:18 PM
Not entirely wrong, IMO.

From the Wikipedia Piper J-3 article:
"An icon of the era, and of American general aviation in general, the J-3 Cub has long been loved by pilots and non-pilots alike, with thousands still in use today. Piper sold 19,073 J-3s between 1938 and 1947, the majority of them L-4s and other military variants. Postwar, thousands of Grasshoppers were civilian-registered under the designation J-3. Hundreds of Cubs were assembled from parts in Canada (by Cub Aircraft as the Cub Prospector), Denmark and Argentina, and by a licensee in Oklahoma.