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Dshell
06-30-2012, 04:22 PM
Can any one tell me where to find a list of paper work I will need for my airworthiness inspection. D Shell

FlyingRon
06-30-2012, 04:26 PM
http://members.eaa.org/home/govt/issues/inspection_guide_airplane.asp

Mike Switzer
06-30-2012, 04:51 PM
First time I have seen that particular web page.


"The engine should have been run for at least 1 hour. The run should have included operating in a nose high above stall attitude to ensure full fuel flow, and a full power run to verify and ensure maximum designed RPM is attained"

How exactly do they propose you do this with an aircraft that has the prop in the rear? If I have the nose above stall attitude on mine the prop will be hitting the ground.

steveinindy
06-30-2012, 05:07 PM
A ramp perhaps to get it into that attitude? That would be my technique if I were building a pusher configuration. Even with a tractor configuration, it could be difficult to get it into the position of a power-on stall for many aircraft. Lucky for you, your aircraft is pretty light isn't it?

Mike Switzer
06-30-2012, 05:25 PM
your aircraft is pretty light isn't it?

Preliminary numbers are just under 1100lb empty, but that is a SWAG.

Mike Switzer
06-30-2012, 06:35 PM
steve your mailbox is full

steveinindy
06-30-2012, 06:43 PM
steve your mailbox is full

Fixed...sorry about that.

WLIU
06-30-2012, 07:11 PM
I think that there is an alternative to running the engine with the airplane jacked up. If you can put the airplane into the specified attitude, with the fuel qty just above the minimum usable, disconnect the fuel line from the carburetor or fuel control, put the fuel line into a bucket, and demonstrate that the flow into the bucket exceeds the max flow specified for the engine, that should be an acceptable test. Yes?

Best of luck,

Wes
N78PS

Dshell
07-01-2012, 06:07 AM
Thanks, that was exactly what I was looking for, Dave

Dave Prizio
08-16-2012, 04:27 PM
The fuel flow test needs to be performed with the airplane nose up, level and nose down. I would strongly suggest not running the airplane while placed nose up or nose down on the ground. It is hazardous enough just getting the plane into those positions without running it.

Wilfred
08-17-2012, 02:16 PM
I built an RV6A and had the FAA do the airworthiness inspection. No engine run was ever made or required.
I built an RV-12 and had a DAR to the inspection; again, no engine run ever made or required.
I have about 6 friends who built experimental aircraft and none of them were asked or required to do an engine run.

Some DARs might ask for this, but I wonder if anyone can show the regulatory citation that requires it.

WLIU
08-23-2012, 07:52 AM
Ask and you shall recieve....

For certificated airplanes. 14 CFR 23.955 states what fuel flow must be demonstrated. As noted previously, you do not have to run the engine to satisfy this requirement, you just have to demonstrate adequate fuel flow in the most critical attitude. The FAR specifically says that you can use a mock-up, so any guidance that suggests a real engine run is required is going beyond what is required for certificated airplanes. For single engine tractor engine installations, the critical attitude is nose up. For single engine pusher installations, the most critical attitude is nose down.

While 23.955 arguably does not directly apply to an experimental amateur built aircraft, especially a kit built aircraft where the manufacturer has already investigated this, the test does not need to take a long time and can be very educational. For a typical tractor engine airplane, pick up the front of the airplane using an engine hoist and a sling around some of the engine mount tubes to get the right attitude, disconnect the fuel line from the fuel control or carburetor, and measure how much fuel flows into a bucket in 60 secs. The amount of fuel in the bucket must calculate out to a minimum of 150% of the sea level full throttle fuel consumption of your engine. Done.

Best of luck,

Wes
N78PS