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CarlB
05-19-2012, 09:04 PM
Our current airport manager came out with a new set of hangar rules. Although I, (others disagree with me), think part of the rules are ok, I think the manager is overly agressive with some of the rules.

1. No non-functioning cars/transportation in hangar, all cars left in hangar are for transportation home, (one rule I agree with, this is an airport, not an auto storage yard).
2. All fridges and airconditioners are to be 18" off floor
3. All fuel not in aircraft have to be stored in fire resistant fuel containers/lockers, (similar restrictions with various flammable fluids).
4. No wood stored in hangar.
5. No welding in hangar, (if one has fuel in a plane in the hangar, I can see this one).
6. One plane per T-hangar.
7. Shelves limited to 36" in width, (now that one can't store wood.., but then storing 48" wide aluminum for building...)
8. No painting at all in hangars, (there is not a paint shed on the field, the previous rule let owners do minor touch-up painting).

The list goes on and on. As written, this will effectively discourage any homebuilding at the airport, even in our chapter hangar. Can anyone in headquarters help us?:(

Kyle Boatright
05-19-2012, 09:42 PM
Have you or a representative group gone to the manager to discuss which rules you think are inappropriate? (Personally, I'd suggest a hangar is supposed to store airplanes, so #6 is pretty dumb.).

Maybe you try that first before bringing in EAA or AOPA. Those rules look like the kind of thing which are within the authority of an airport manager. They don't stop you from using the airport or storing an aircraft in the hangar. They just stop you from doing some things which might put your aircraft or others at risk.

martymayes
05-19-2012, 10:12 PM
I could list pages of ridiculous airport/hangar rules I've had to endure and some of the ones you list are indeed ridiculous. All I can say is choose your battles wisely, you don't want to get ousted over something that you can work around.

Hangar10
05-20-2012, 12:52 AM
Interesting.

When I decided to rent a hangar a few years ago, I asked our airport owner, "Do you mind if I build in this hangar?" He replied, "Not at all! In fact we encourage it!" That attitude seems to be the norm around here as I can think of 6 or 7 local airports where building and restoration is taking place. Some are privately owned, others are municipal.

All those rules sound a little picky.

Fridge 18" off floor? Why?
No wood? Does that also mean no wood airplanes?

Strange... just glad we don't have those issues here.

vaflier
05-20-2012, 07:25 PM
I would suspect that the requirement to have your fridge 18 inches off the floor stems from the fact that any fuel vapor would lay near the floor and your fridge has relays on the compressor which is usually in the bottom of the fridge. The relay closing or opening could casue a spark which could ignite any fuel vapors lying on the floor. In fact I beleive there is something in the fire codes concerning this type of thing. I will have to read through the NFPA fire codes to be sure. Most airports are now required to comply with the national fire codes and I would suspect that is what is driving many of the new rules. If they do not they risk having their insurance coverage canceled. If this is the cause of your new policies it would have been nice if they had just explained to everyone why they had to insitute new policies. Generally most people are much more willing to go along with the rules if they understand how they came about. It sounds like someone did a very poor job of customer relations.

steveinindy
05-20-2012, 08:30 PM
I would suspect that the requirement to have your fridge 18 inches off the floor stems from the fact that any fuel vapor would lay near the floor and your fridge has relays on the compressor which is usually in the bottom of the fridge. The relay closing or opening could casue a spark which could ignite any fuel vapors lying on the floor.

That's my guess.


In fact I beleive there is something in the fire codes concerning this type of thing.

For "industrial" settings, normally. It varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction but it does make sense and is on the books in many areas. This was a very common violation when I used to help a fire inspector buddy of mine with his 'rounds' a number of years ago while a volunteer firefighter.


It sounds like someone did a very poor job of customer relations.

That or the person is inexperienced with regards to what goes on in most hangars and/or the airport had a bad experience with a homebuilder and does not wish a repeat.

martymayes
05-20-2012, 09:43 PM
Shelves limited to 36" in width, (now that one can't store wood.., but then storing 48" wide aluminum for building...)

Hey Carl, can you make your 36" shelves out of wood? Wonder if you can have a workbench that's wider than 36"...........

I think I could have fun with some of their rules......Make your shelves 36" wide and space them 20" off the wall. That should give you a place to store your aluminum sheet.

steveinindy
05-20-2012, 11:04 PM
Or store it vertically.

martymayes
05-21-2012, 11:12 AM
I'd rather mess with them. Wrap all your wood up in Christmas gift paper. Fer sure they won't come up with a rule saying "No Christmas presents can be stored in hanagar" but you never know.....

Bill Berson
05-21-2012, 01:29 PM
Perhaps if you sign a release and assume responsibility for painting, etc. they will allow it.
I just got the idea today after I made a dental appointment. The latest news finds many X-rays are not needed, so I asked if I could skip the routine X-ray. They said fine, just sign a release.

RV8505
05-21-2012, 01:39 PM
painting in the hangers is not a good idea. There was a guy painting in our t hangers in hartford and the over spray drifted thru the hangers and got on everyones planes.. It cost the fellow responsible alot of money and several friends in the process.

steveinindy
05-21-2012, 03:20 PM
The latest news finds many X-rays are not needed, so I asked if I could skip the routine X-ray. They said fine, just sign a release.

Sorry to go completely off-topic: The dentist I go to hear locally was talking about that at my last appointment. He made the comment that he'll skip them if doesn't feel their necessary but if it's really necessary in his mind and the patient is concerned about cost, the easiest way to save money is to waive the fees for the x-rays.


Perhaps if you sign a release and assume responsibility for painting, etc. they will allow it.

I find that 9 times out of 10, if you act nicely and assume the legal culpability, you can get permission to damn near anything.

Kyle Boatright
05-21-2012, 05:05 PM
painting in the hangers is not a good idea. There was a guy painting in our t hangers in hartford and the over spray drifted thru the hangers and got on everyones planes.. It cost the fellow responsible alot of money and several friends in the process.

Exactly. My plane has gotten overspray on it at least twice, possibly three times because different neighbors were "just touching up a wingtip" or something. Without a paint booth and an appropriate filter system on the extraction side of the booth, there will be overspray problems. The only question is which way the wind blows it.

Mike M
05-22-2012, 08:38 AM
Our current airport manager came out with a new set of hangar rules. Although I, (others disagree with me), think part of the rules are ok, I think the manager is overly aggressive with some of the rules.

ok, this isn't really new. is there a universal fire code for airports or something? somebody out there knows the source of these rules that keep popping up all over the place. they usually come about after a change in airport management when somebody goes to a qualification school for govspec and comes back all hyped up. most make some sense, like the one about only one aircraft per hangar just to maximize revenue. but some don't, like what gets stored in hangars. why NOT rent out hangars for just plain ol' storage if they'd be empty instead? include a lease provision that the rental is only until an aircraft needs space, make some bucks. etc etc

anyway, if you know the source for stupid, please post the link along with your experiences on fighting it.

FlyingRon
05-22-2012, 08:50 AM
Not that I am aware of. There are several model codes but fire codes tend to vary a lot.

Frankly, those aren't the worst rules I've seen. Frankly, if it were me I would BAN fuel not inside of vehicle tanks. Gasoline has no business being stored inside of hangars other than in the aircraft. Most of the major hangar fires I've seen have involved some fuel mishandling.

vaflier
05-22-2012, 11:09 AM
ok, this isn't really new. is there a universal fire code for airports Most airports and government facilities now are required to be in compliance with NFPA 30 part of the national fire codes.

steveinindy
05-22-2012, 05:23 PM
is there a universal fire code for airports or something?

Yes, no and it kind of doesn't matter in a way. They are beholden to the various local and state regulations as well as NFPA 30 and the regs pertinent to ARFF at whatever level of service they provide.

RV8505
05-22-2012, 06:47 PM
"Yes, no and it kind of doesn't matter in a way." I sounds like a typical goverment answer.

martymayes
05-22-2012, 09:34 PM
Storing fuel inside the fuel tanks of a C-340 is not a good idea either......

1995

Frank Giger
05-22-2012, 11:57 PM
The trick to if rules are rediculous or not is enforcement.

"No storing wood" is a prime example of how this could be abused. Having a pallet in the corner to keep stuff off the floor or a 2x4 propped against a shelf shouldn't bring the wrath of Airport Authorities, but a big stack of random lumber is a rodent's hotel and shouldn't be allowed.

If building is allowed, a lumber rack for wooden planes should be able to get a quick blessing.

Of course all of this assumes that the airport people actually look at what's going on in hangars.

steveinindy
05-23-2012, 07:38 AM
"Yes, no and it kind of doesn't matter in a way." I sounds like a typical goverment answer.

It does don't it? LOL

I was trying to point out that there are regulations specific to fire prevention and suppression on airports but at the same time there are no across the board standards for universal use (since it depends on what "type" of airport it is) and that it doesn't really matter because all the other applicable (industrial as an example) fire codes for the national, state and local level are applicable and these are the ones most likely to be enforced by an inspector since they are the regulations they are most familiar with.

steveinindy
05-23-2012, 07:39 AM
Storing fuel inside the fuel tanks of a C-340 is not a good idea either......

1995

What the hell happened there?

tonycondon
05-23-2012, 11:24 AM
What the hell happened there?

No kidding, I want to know too, and if anything that picture should show that the wing tanks of a 340 are a GREAT place to store fuel. Another Brand "C" would probably not have fared so well.

martymayes
05-23-2012, 04:14 PM
The operator said he noticed a fuel odor when entering the plane over a 3 week period prior to the accident. One day he got in, turned on the master switch which made a tiny spark, the one in a million odds that the fuel air ratio would be perfect hit jackpot and BOOM! There he was sitting in the seat, plane disintegrated around him, hand still on the master switch, saying "What the........?"

If you step back and look at the big picture, storing gasoline in a proper storage container is no more dangerous than than storing it in a vehicle fuel tank. It has to be handled with care, obviously. A requirement stating fuel can be in a hangar ONLY when in a vehicle tank may theroetically reduce the "Bubba risk" so Bubba won't keep his gasoline filled milk jug in the hangar but since Bubba has a plane, all bets are off.

Bill Berson
05-23-2012, 06:30 PM
As Marty said, fuel in proper a container is no problem.
Draining fuel in the hangar is a big mistake however, the fumes and static from the flow can start a fire. Don't fill or defuel in the hangar with no wind to blow away the fumes. And be careful outside when defueling as well.

vaflier
05-23-2012, 08:49 PM
The reason you see a lot of these types of rules being enforced at many airports has a lot more to do with limiting the airports liability in the event of a fire or accident. As a Commisioner at our local airport I have fought against many rules of a similar nature. By enforcing the fire codes and limiting what you can store in your hanger the risk of fire canbe greatly reduced, and in the event a fire occurs it greatly reduces the airports liability exposure. I am all for reducing the fire risk and for common sense rules. You cannot however eliminate all risk and that is why you buy insurance. If airport management fails to exercise good sense they will likely end up with a bunch of empty hangars and reduced income. I really do get sick of hearing about liability, Life is full of risk, it can be managed but not at the expense of being scared to live.

blansburgh
05-24-2012, 08:40 PM
Seriously, guys. This is such an old story. It's about power trips by martinets. My advice is to simply threaten the man with physical violence if he doesn't just get out of your business. Some of you will feel that this goes too far. But reasoned response simply doesn't work with these jerks. Best of luck.

Mike M
05-24-2012, 09:08 PM
It's about power trips by martinets. My advice is to simply threaten the man with physical violence if he doesn't just get out of your business. ... reasoned response simply doesn't work with these jerks.

regrettably true. but a threat has no power if not credible. are you willing to follow through? hypothetically, of course, because none of us would ever actually punch anybody's lights out. nope. not me. never. and certainly not you. no, sir, officer.

RV8505
05-24-2012, 09:20 PM
Violence is not the way.. I found that you can fix alot of things in life with a big howdy a weber grill, a fridge full of beer/ sodas and a big smile. The rules don't seem that bad anyway. Just a means to keep everyone getting along. The only rule I didn't like is the more than one plane in a hanger but I am sure there is a compromise availiable. See aviation trouble makers http://eaaforums.org/showthread.php?1969-Aviation-Trouble-Makers

rawheels
05-25-2012, 09:47 AM
We run a small airport, and we've sent out the same kind of notice to renters in the past. It boils down to a piece of paper that we can point to, when something happens, that shows that we weren't negligent and that we notified the renters. Everybody hates to hear about "liability", but if the row of hangars burn down I'll bet you'll want some money for your damaged plane. If the insurance company sees any sort of code violation they may not pay, and we'll be asking you to.

You need to TALK with the manager. We aren't a bunch of kill joys and jerks that have nothing better to do than to limit what you can do in your rented hangar. We want to keep the airport running for longer than you do! Here is my take on the list:

* The insurance for our airport requires that the hangars be used for aircraft and not as a general storage facility. Amazingly we have to require that at least one aircraft has to be parked in the hangar because we have had people who want to just rent it as a cheap storage building. We don't limit what else gets put in the building, but maybe the insurance does at your place. So, unless you want to pay higher rent for the additional insurance rider, then obey. Again, TALK with the manager. It may be a situation where a single individual made it an issue.

* Looks like a few of the items are fire codes. They probably should have included that all chemicals should be in a fire cabinet too. Again, this is so that when something does explode and the insurance company says that they aren't going to pay because we didn't follow code, we can point to the letter that was sent and you get to pay for the damage. Remember, we like you as a renter, but we want the airport to survive.

* I can see the "one plane per T-hangar" rule. It wouldn't be a problem with folding wings or a project plane, but we did have one individual that tried to park two planes in an open-front T-hangar. One plane always had a wing and prop slightly out in the taxi area. Again, talk with the manager, and see what the real issue is.

* Painting. This is a huge one for me. I have a hangar that I can rent to you with nice metallic blue paint on the inside from the last guy who wanted to "touch-up" his plane. Can't tell you how many concrete floors have paint outlines from misc painted parts too. The problem is that you have to make the rules strict enough to keep the idiots from damaging anything. Having a good relationship with the manager and being respectful with everyone's property will go a long way towards the airport owners turning a blind eye towards your "infractions".

steveinindy
05-25-2012, 06:32 PM
The operator said he noticed a fuel odor when entering the plane over a 3 week period prior to the accident. One day he got in, turned on the master switch which made a tiny spark, the one in a million odds that the fuel air ratio would be perfect hit jackpot and BOOM! There he was sitting in the seat, plane disintegrated around him, hand still on the master switch, saying "What the........?"

Marty, no offense but remember that I'm pretty experienced with what happens in various scenarios as both a safety researcher and someone trained to recognize the mechanisms of fire from my time as a fire department officer.

What you're describing doesn't match that photograph in the slightest nor is it really compatible with survival for a couple of reasons. Inhalation of superheated gases associated with a flash fire or the thermal effects from a fire large enough to create the over pressure to blow apart aeronautical structure are both going make it so that someone is going to be critically injured or rapidly dead and not sitting there wondering what the hell just happened.

I think you were misinformed. The risk you're describing is real- albeit extremely small- but that aircraft would have burned like a funeral pyre in the scenario you describe. It looks like a collision of some sort, mostly like on the ground with a larger aircraft or a building. I can't read the tail number but if you can figure it out, it would certainly settle the question of what really happened.

steveinindy
05-25-2012, 06:41 PM
I have a hangar that I can rent to you with nice metallic blue paint on the inside from the last guy who wanted to "touch-up" his plane

How much are we talking? I'm going to be looking for a place to build an LSA soon and a hangar might be a better option than trying to get my fiancee and her dad to clean out the garage. LOL

dusterpilot
05-25-2012, 07:15 PM
1. No non-functioning cars/transportation in hangar, all cars left in hangar are for transportation home.
This one is a Federal Grant Assurance that is being emphasized by the FAA. No cars, RVs, boats, or other non-aerial vehicles can be stored inside an airport fence without endangering an airport's Airport Improvement Program grant funds.

Most all those rules are driven by grant assurances, insurance, fire codes, environmental law, etc.

Does your airfield have a shop with an A&P that is paying rent, liability and other insurance? He's made an investment that can be harmed by someone working on someone else's plane from the trunk of their car. Another grant assurance requires a fair and level playing field which is interpreted as preventing freelance mechanics.

As a long-time aircraft owner and airport manager, I occasionally find it difficult and unreasonable to comply with the regulations I am supposed to be enforcing. (Now 36" shelves? I have no idea what's driving that one.)

martymayes
05-25-2012, 09:39 PM
Marty, no offense but remember that I'm pretty experienced with what happens in various scenarios as both a safety researcher and someone trained to recognize the mechanisms of fire from my time as a fire department officer.

What you're describing doesn't match that photograph in the slightest nor is it really compatible with survival for a couple of reasons. Inhalation of superheated gases associated with a flash fire or the thermal effects from a fire large enough to create the over pressure to blow apart aeronautical structure are both going make it so that someone is going to be critically injured or rapidly dead and not sitting there wondering what the hell just happened.

I think you were misinformed. The risk you're describing is real- albeit extremely small- but that aircraft would have burned like a funeral pyre in the scenario you describe. It looks like a collision of some sort, mostly like on the ground with a larger aircraft or a building. I can't read the tail number but if you can figure it out, it would certainly settle the question of what really happened.


Golly gee whiz steveinindy, before postulating three paragraphs of BS to tell me I'm wrong you should explore Google. "Dec. 2004 + Lafayette, La + Cessna 340 + explodes + etc.", I'll help you get started with the avweb linky below. I know the guy that was sitting in the airplane when it exploded so don't tell me what didn't happen (insert rolls eyes emoticon here, again).

http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/briefs/188707-1.html

martymayes
05-25-2012, 09:53 PM
Does your airfield have a shop with an A&P that is paying rent, liability and other insurance? He's made an investment that can be harmed by someone working on someone else's plane from the trunk of their car. Another grant assurance requires a fair and level playing field which is interpreted as preventing freelance mechanics.


Who's interpretation is that? Where is it written? I'd like to see it.

steveinindy
05-25-2012, 10:40 PM
Golly gee whiz steveinindy, before postulating three paragraphs of BS to tell me I'm wrong you should explore Google. "Dec. 2004 + Lafayette, La + Cessna 340 + explodes + etc.", I'll help you get started with the avweb linky below. I know the guy that was sitting in the airplane when it exploded so don't tell me what didn't happen

All I said was that it doesn't look like it. There are airplane crash photos circulating on the internet with false stories that I was wagering an educated guess that this was another one of those. It looked a lot like what happened when the wing of an airliner or other large aircraft "scalps" a smaller airplane and there was no apparent matching NTSB report when I went looking for an explanation. That's why I was guessing that you had been told something inaccurate.

I've seen personally (as a deputy coroner or firefighter) what happens when fuel (or other flammable) vapors ignite in an enclosed space and it's really freakishly unusual to have enough force involved to blow the roof off something structurally sound like a plane or car without killing or at least severely maiming the person inside. Usually the windows give out and the frame of the vehicle is maybe a little distorted but otherwise intact. My apologies and I stand corrected. This one goes in the "That guy was darn lucky" pile I guess.

RV8505
05-25-2012, 10:52 PM
I dont know.................! I would never say never. When I was on The Terre Haute fire Dept I saw some strange stuff! I once seen a house blown up and the guy was in a couch in a tree a ok. The hosue was kindleing and flatened. He was a golfer and there were golf balls everywhere ! It was like Mr moose droped those ping pong balls on Kaptain Kangeroo. He should have died.

Steve if your still a fireman I would build it at the fire house.. I rebuilt most of a Cessna 172 at Fire house number 7 in T.H. One peice at a time.
Anyway, I didn't see a thing in them there rules about cheap couches and a strpper pole.

RV8505
05-25-2012, 11:09 PM
http://www.aero-news.net/subscribe.cfm?do=main.textpost&id=c7aad273-7aff-484f-b3c6-9edbe3668c12

steveinindy
05-26-2012, 12:56 AM
I rebuilt most of a Cessna 172 at Fire house number 7 in T.H. One peice at a time.

So that was you....LOL That story has become part of THFD and Vigo County legend. I was taught about it during my EMT class and heard the story repeated during my fire school. LOL


I once seen a house blown up and the guy was in a couch in a tree a ok.

Yeah, I've seen a couple of house explosions like that but not that dramatic. I was basing the airplane educated guess on the number of times I've seen people try to carry gasoline in their back seat and have a cigarette at the same time. It just doesn't end well normally. Ditto for trying to move a working meth lab in a T-top Camaro. It's the quickest way to find out what it's like to be ejected from an aircraft. That one happened in front of the gas station at 59 and 46 over in Clay County. It was the first time I ever saw skin actually "dripping" off someone. I wish I could say it was the only time. :(


Anyway, I didn't see a thing in them there rules about cheap couches and a strpper pole.

It's a shame that you weren't at one of the other stations (I think it was Station Five). They allegedly got caught with a stripper in their station a few years back. ;)


Steve if your still a fireman I would build it at the fire house

I gave it up a few years back when the ex-wife decided she didn't want me "risking my neck". If I wind up somewhere with a volunteer department, I'll probably pick it back up but I did my firefighting as a volly and my EMS work as a paid guy and as a volunteer.

steveinindy
05-26-2012, 01:00 AM
http://www.aero-news.net/subscribe.cfm?do=main.textpost&id=c7aad273-7aff-484f-b3c6-9edbe3668c12

That's amazing. It kind of makes you wonder about the structural integrity of the 340 though doesn't it? Not even enough heat to cause significant fire damage but enough overpressure to rip the roof off.

dusterpilot
05-26-2012, 07:10 AM
Who's interpretation is that? Where is it written? I'd like to see it.

Ok, here you go....

"22 Economic Nondiscrimination.
"c. Each fixed-based operator at the airport shall be subject to the same rates, fees, rentals, and other charges as are uniformly applicable to all other fixed-based operators making the same or similar uses of such airport and utilizing the same or similar facilities." [Someone offering maintenance services for hire at an airport is considered a fixed-based operator and they all must be treated equally. If you require insurance or an office for one, you must require all to have the same.]

"f. It will not exercise or grant any right or privilege which operates to prevent any person, firm, or corporation operating aircraft on the airport from performing any services on its own aircraft with its own employees that it may choose to perform."[I] [This one guarantees you the right to work on your own aircraft. However, if you aren't withholding payroll taxes and providing other benefits to the mechanic, he/she is NOT an employee. He's a freelancer.]

"g. In the event the sponsor itself exercises any of the rights and privileges referred to in this assurance, the services involved will be provided on the same conditions as would apply to the furnishing of such services by commercial aeronautical service providers authorized by the sponsor under these provisions."

"h. The sponsor may establish such reasonable, and not unjustly discriminatory, conditions to be met by all users of the airport as may be necessary for the safe and efficient operation of the airport." [That's a big, wide-open assurance that covers lots of "safety" rules.]

"i. The sponsor may prohibit or limit any given type, kind or class of aeronautical use of the airport if such action is necessary for the safe operation of the airport or necessary to serve the civil aviation needs of the public." [Another one.]

"24. Fee and Rental Structure. It will maintain a fee and rental structure for the facilities and services at the airport which will make the airport as self-sustaining as possible under the circumstances existing at the particular airport, taking into account such factors as the volume of traffic and economy of collection." [You can't give it away and if there's an opportunity to collect a fee, you should.]

"38. Hangar Construction. If the airport owner or operator and a person who owns an aircraft agree that a hangar is to be constructed at the airport for the aircraft at the aircraft owner’s expense, the airport owner or operator will grant to the aircraft owner for the hangar a long term lease that is subject to such terms and conditions on the hangar as the airport owner or operator may impose." [And here's another one that says the airport can control what goes on inside your private hangar.]

See http://www.faa.gov/airports/aip/grant_assurances/media/airport_sponsor_assurances_2012.pdf for all 39 Federal Grant Assurances that airport operators must comply with.

martymayes
05-26-2012, 08:34 AM
Ok, here you go....

I am familar with the rules......I was asking about the "interpretations" or opinions. You know what they say about opinions. Some of those "interpretations" won't hold water in a legal arena. BTDT.

kscessnadriver
05-26-2012, 11:22 AM
I am familar with the rules......I was asking about the "interpretations" or opinions. You know what they say about opinions. Some of those "interpretations" won't hold water in a legal arena. BTDT.

Sure, but how much money are you willing to spend to find out?

dusterpilot
05-26-2012, 02:46 PM
I am familar with the rules......I was asking about the "interpretations" or opinions.

Call the Detroit Airports District Office at 734-229-2900 and they'd be happy to give you both FAA interpretations and their opinions. I deal with the Chicago ADO. For those of you in other areas, your local ADO can be found at http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/arp/regional_offices/. If you have a disagreement with your airport manager, sit down and talk with him. If you can't come to agreement, give the ADO a call and get their opinion. I know of several airport managers who have been told by the FAA that their actions violate their grant assurances and the tenant is correct. Don't hesitate to get that FAA interpretation. That's what their paid for.

an erie place
05-28-2012, 06:34 AM
Just start your own airport, that will take care of all your problems.

steveinindy
05-28-2012, 10:07 AM
Just start your own airport, that will take care of all your problems.

Trust me....I thought about it until I realized how much asphalt and/or concrete would cost for a decent length runway not to mention the lighting. The ability to taxi out of the backside of my home and takeoff for dinner wherever I would like to go is really appealing.

Mike Berg
05-28-2012, 03:39 PM
Part of the problem is that some rules or limitations are necessary. Otherwise the airport (ours happens to be a private field owned by the flying club) becomes a depository for unwanted junk, old cars, tires, building materials, furniture, etc. etc.

Our bylaws state that hangars are for the primary storage of aircraft. Not that one can't keep a boat or trailer in there in addition to the aircraft but some folks just don't see junk as junk.

Mike M
05-29-2012, 06:43 AM
Trust me....I thought about it until I realized how much asphalt and/or concrete would cost for a decent length runway not to mention the lighting. The ability to taxi out of the backside of my home and takeoff for dinner wherever I would like to go is really appealing.

http://www.flyinhomes.com/browseproperties.html

i own two airport homes, one on FA40 and one on 19AZ. either is for sale, take your pick.

steveinindy
05-29-2012, 09:21 AM
I'd be completely game for owning such a home, but the problem is that we're still both in school so we are more still in the need to rent as there will probably be at two more moves before all is said and done. The one in Arizona would be nice if I wind up at ERAU there in Prescott since it would only be like a 40 minute commute (used to going over an hour each way to and from work). It'd be even quicker to hop it in a plane. ;)